The higher-tech Camden Road Sainsbury’s created by Grimshaw, and the housing complicated constructed alongside it, have been awarded Grade II-listed status.

The Sainsbury’s in London is the initially goal-constructed supermarket to be awarded a location on the National Heritage List for England, which recognises architecture that must be preserved.

The Camden Road Sainsbury’s is constructed in the higher-tech architecture style

Grand Union Stroll, a series of canal-side terraced homes constructed by Grimshaw, has also been recognised by Historic England.

Each are portion of the Grand Union Complicated, a series of buildings constructed by Grimshaw amongst 1986 and 1988 for Sainsbury’s on a former industrial web-site in Camden.

Camden Road Sainsbury's and a residential complex in London built in the High-tech style by architects Grimshaw have been given listed Grade II-listed status.
It is the initially goal-constructed supermarket to be offered listed status

“The Camden Road Sainsbury’s is an outstanding instance of higher-tech architecture in a busy urban setting,” stated Duncan Wilson, chief executive of Historic England – the UK physique that lists buildings.

“It is an unapologetically futuristic creating which also sits comfortably alongside its historic neighbours – matching the scale of the 19th-century terrace opposite – and rightly deserves to be recognised for its architectural significance.”

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Camden Road Sainsbury's and a residential complex in London built in the High-tech style by architects Grimshaw have been given listed Grade II-listed status.
Historic England named Camden Road Sainsbury’s an “unapologetically futuristic creating”

Founder of Grimshaw and RIBA Gold Medal-winning architect Nicholas Grimshaw was a single of the pioneers of the higher-tech style of architecture that emerged in the 1970s.

It is characterised by hugely engineered buildings that usually use industrial elements and clearly show their structure.

Camden Road Sainsbury's and a residential complex in London built in the High-tech style by architects Grimshaw have been given listed Grade II-listed status.
Grand Union Stroll is formed of ten terraced homes and two flats

The Camden Road Sainsbury’s is clad in aluminium and glass panels, with a visible steel frame. Inside, its gently curving ceiling trusses are created to reference old market place halls.

Cutting edge technologies was applied to the style, like a fireproof coating for the frame that had been created for military purposes. This also protects the structure from the emissions of the busy most important road.

Camden Road Sainsbury's and a residential complex in London built in the High-tech style by architects Grimshaw have been given listed Grade II-listed status.
The residences are uncommon examples of residential higher-tech architecture

Grand Union Stroll is a uncommon instance of higher-tech style applied for residential use. The ten homes and two flats have an industrial aesthetic, with aluminium panels and porthole-style windows.

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The horizontal ribs of the back walls match these to the rear of the Sainsbury’s.

Camden Road Sainsbury's and a residential complex in London built in the High-tech style by architects Grimshaw have been given listed Grade II-listed status.
Grimshaw constructed the Grand Union Complicated in the 1980s

The project is the most recent Grimshaw project to be listed. Each the Financial Instances printing performs in the Docklands and The Western Morning News creating in Plymouth are currently listed.

Other listed higher-tech buildings in England at the moment incorporate the Lloyd’s Creating by Rogers Stirck Harbour and Partners, and two buildings by Hopkins Architects – the Schlumberger Gould Analysis Centre and Hopkins Home.

3 of the higher-tech buildings by Foster + Partners – the Sainsbury’s Centre, the Willis Creating and the Spectrum Creating, formerly named the Renault Distribution Centre – are also listed.

Photography is by Chris Redgrave for Historic England.

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